CloudLinux helps protect websites in a shared website hosting environment. If one of the websites on the servers gets attacked or gets a sudden growth in popularity and a lot of unexpected traffic, it will start draining all of the server resources, affecting other websites. CloudLinux makes sure this doesn’t happen. It will either slow down the website to stop it from hogging all resources or it will temporarily shut it down.
A Web service involves a service provider and a service requester (client). Because Web services feature language transparency, it doesn’t matter whether the underlying system that provides the service is written in Java while the client is written in Perl, Python or Ruby. For example, through Web services a Windows server can interact with a Linux server or serve an application to computer desktops, laptops or smart phones and other mobile devices over the World Wide Web.
ImageShack has a non-premium account option and a free 30-day trial to check out the premium features. This image hosting alternative has a great looking interface, somewhat similar to how Pinterest showcases its images in a pinboard-style layout. You can use it to upload as many high-res photos as you want, create albums, organize everything with tags and discover featured photos from other users for inspiration.
PostImage allows you to create a gallery with a unique link to share with others. Individual files also each have a direct link that you can share with others. You can resize your photos when you upload them. If you’re planning on only sharing an image once, you can choose to let the photo expire after one day, one week, or one month. If you don’t want the photos to expire, they’ll stay on the site forever.
In practice, a Web service commonly provides an object-oriented Web-based interface to a database server, utilized for example by another Web server, or by a mobile app, that provides a user interface to the end-user. Many organizations that provide data in formatted HTML pages will also provide that data on their server as XML or JSON, often through a Web service to allow syndication, for example, Wikipedia's Export. Another application offered to the end-user may be a mashup, where a Web server consumes several Web services at different machines and compiles the content into one user interface.
You don’t need to create an account to upload images to Use, but you can make your photos public or private. Use offers a photo editor and image re-sizer, and you can also organize your photos into albums. The site doesn’t give direct links, but you can right-click on your photos to copy the image URL, or you can use the site’s social sharing buttons to post your uploads to social media sites.
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